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Couples Hotel and Resorts

Book by July 31, 2011; Travel Between August 21 and December 25, 2011.

  • $100 in spa credits per day per room*
  • 5 night minimum stay – Rates are per couple / per night
  • Participating resorts: Couples Tower Isle
  • Rate code GSPA and XSPA will display when booking online

Our special 2011 offers are reflected in the all-inclusive rates below. (Rates are quoted per couple/per night in US dollars. All service charges, taxes, gratuities are included).

 
COUPLES TOWER ISLE
Deluxe Garden Published Rate % Savings You Pay
April 17 – August 20, 2011 647 39% 395
August 21 – October 31, 2011 627 45% 345
November 1 – 30, 2011 647 45% 356
December 1 – December 25, 2011 627 45% 345
Superior Ocean
April 17 – August 20, 2011 671 39% 409
August 21 – October 31, 2011 650 45% 358
November 1 – 30, 2011 671 45% 369
December 1 – December 25, 2011 650 45% 358
Deluxe Ocean
April 17 – August 20, 2011 683 39% 416
August 21 – October 31, 2011 662 45% 364
November 1 – 30, 2011 683 45% 376
December 1 – December 25, 2011 662 45% 364
Premier Ocean
April 17 – August 20, 2011 707 39% 431
August 21 – October 31, 2011 686 45% 377
November 1 – 30, 2011 707 45% 389
December 1 – December 25, 2011 686 45% 377
Garden Jr. Suite
April 17 – August 20, 2011 746 39% 455
August 21 – October 31, 2011 728 44% 408
November 1 – 30, 2011 746 44% 418
December 1 – December 25, 2011 728 44% 407
Ocean Jr. Suite
April 17 – August 20, 2011 779 39% 475
August 21 – October 31, 2011 761 44% 426
November 1 – 30, 2011 779 44% 436
December 1 – December 25, 2011 761 44% 426
One Bedroom Suite
April 17 – August 20, 2011 872 42% 506
August 21 – October 31, 2011 854 42% 495
November 1 – 30, 2011 872 42% 506
December 1 – December 25, 2011 854 42% 496

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Vacaciones en Orlando


Walt Disney World Resort, algunas veces llamado solamente Walt Disney World o Disney World es un complejo recreacional famoso por sus parques temáticos y numerosos hoteles. El complejo es operado por una división de la compañía Disney, que es la propietaria. Está localizado en la zona de Lake Buena Vista y Bay Lake en Florida, fuera de los límites de la ciudad de Orlando.
La construcción empezó en 1967, menos de un año después de la muerte de Walt Disney. El 1 de octubre de 1971, abrió sus puertas solo el parque conocido como Magic Kingdom, más tarde se fueron añadiendo al complejo los parques temáticos Epcot, Disney’s Hollywood Studios y Disney Animal Kingdom.
Además de los 4 parques temáticos principales, el complejo cuenta con 2 parques acuáticos, 6 circuitos de golf, un complejo deportivo, una pista de carreras, 23 hoteles de Disney y numerosas tiendas, restaurantes y lugares de entretenimiento. El área total de la propiedad cuenta con más de 8.094 ha y es el complejo de parques témáticos más grande del mundo, a pesar de que en la última década, grandes extensiones de terreno se han vendido para conjuntos residenciales y otros proyectos, incluyendo el terreno ahora ocupado por la ciudad de Celebration, construida pero administrada por Disney.
Se puede acceder al complejo a través de la carretera interestatal 4, por medio de la salida 62B (World Drive), 64B (US 192 West), 65B (Osceola Parkway West), 67B (SR 536 West) y 68 (SR 535 North). Además en el 2006 se abrió una nueva entrada a través de la salida 8 en State Road 429, conocida como Western Expressway.

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Dominican Republic

Tourism is fueling the Dominican Republic’s economic growth. For example, the contribution of travel and tourism to employment is expected to rise from 550,000 jobs in 2008—14.4% of total employment or 1 in every 7 jobs—to 743,000 jobs—14.2% of total employment or 1 in every 7.1 jobs by 2018.[122] With the construction of projects like Cap Cana, San Souci Port in Santo Domingo, and Moon Palace Resort in Punta Cana, the Dominican Republic expects increased tourism activity in the upcoming year. Ecotourism has been a topic increasingly important in the nation, with towns like Jarabacoa and neighboring Constanza, and locations like the Pico Duarte, Bahia de Las Aguilas and others becoming more significant in efforts to increase direct benefits from tourism.
Services and transportation

Main articles: Transportation in the Dominican Republic and List of airports in the Dominican Republic

Boeing 737-800 at Cibao International Airport in Santiago
Communications
Main article: Communications in the Dominican Republic
The Dominican Republic has a well-developed telecommunications infrastructure, with extensive mobile phone and landline services. Cable Internet and DSL are available in most parts of the country, and many Internet service providers offer 3G wireless internet service. The reported speeds are from 256 kbit/s / 128 kbit/s for residential services, up to 5 Mbit/s / 1 Mbit/s for residential service. For commercial service there are speeds from 256 kbit/s up to 154 Mbit/s. (Each set of numbers denotes downstream/upstream speed; that is, to the user/from the user.) Projects to extend Wi-Fi hot spots have been made in Santo Domingo. The country’s commercial radio stations and television stations are in the process of transferring to the digital spectrum, via HD Radio and HDTV. The telecommunications regulator in the country is INDOTEL (Instituto Dominicano de Telecomunicaciones).
The largest telecommunications company is Claro Codetel, a provider of wireless, landline, broadband, and IPTV services which is part of Carlos Slim Helú’s América Móvil.
Indotel reports that as of June 5, 2009 there are more than 8 million phone line subscribers (land and cell users) in the D.R., representing 81% of the country’s population and a fivefold increase since the year 2000, when there were 1.6 million. The communications sector generates about 3.0% of the GDP.[123] Indotel reports 6,807,831 prepaid and just under a million (994,027) post-pay (under-contract) cell user accounts. For fixed phone lines (non-cell) it reports 678,901 dedicated lines in use for residential services. For business lines it reports 266,341. For public phones/services it reports 13,639. As of the second quarter of 2008, there are no more analog lines in the trunk services by local providers. Indotel reports 2,439,997 Internet users in the country for the end of March 2009.[124]
In November 2009, the Dominican Republic became the first Latin American country to pledge to include a “gender perspective” in every information and communications technology (ICT) initiative and policy developed by the government.[125] The Dominican Republic is leading Latin American governments’ thinking around gender and technology as part of the regional eLAC2010 plan. The tool the Dominicans have chosen to design and evaluate all the public policies is the APC Gender Evaluation Methodology (GEM).
Electricity
Electric power service has been unreliable since the Trujillo era, and as much as 75% of the equipment is that old. In some places the power goes out every day.[citation needed] The country’s antiquated power grid causes transmission losses which account for a large share of billed electricity from generators. The privatization of the sector started under a previous administration of Leonel Fernández.[56] The recent investment in a “Santo Domingo-Santiago Electrical Highway” to carry 345 KV power,[126] with reduced losses in transmission, is being heralded as a major capital improvement to the national grid since the mid-1960s.
During the Trujillo regime, electrical service was introduced to many cities; still, almost 95% of usage was not billed at all. Around half of the Dominican Republic’s 2.1 million houses have no meters and so most do not pay or just pay a fixed monthly rate for their electric service.[127]
Household and general electrical service is delivered at 110 volts alternating at 60 Hz; electrically powered items from the United States work with no modifications. The majority of the country has access to electricity. Still, in 2007 some areas have outages lasting as long as 20 hours a day. Tourist areas tend to have more reliable power, as do business, travel, healthcare, and vital infrastructure. The situation improved in 2006, with 200 circuits (40% of the total) providing permanent electricity, as 85% of electric demand overall was met and blackouts were reduced from 6.3 hours per day to 3.7.[citation needed] Concentrated efforts were announced to increase efficiency of delivery to places where the collection rate reached 70%.[128] The electricity sector is highly politicized. Some generating companies are undercapitalized and at times unable to purchase adequate fuel supplies.[14]
Transportation
Main article: Highways and Routes in the Dominican Republic
The Dominican Republic has five major highways which take travelers to every major town in the country. The three major highways are DR-1, DR-2, and DR-3, which go to the northern, southwestern, and eastern parts of the country, respectively. There is a new, 106-kilometer toll road that connects Santo Domingo with the country’s northeastern peninsula. Travelers may now arrive in the Samaná Peninsula in less than two hours. Most routes interconnecting small towns in the country are unpaved, but improving.
The Santo Domingo Metro is the first mass transit system in the country, and second in the Caribbean and Central American nations, after the Tren Urbano in San Juan, Puerto Rico. On February 27, 2008 president Leonel Fernández test rode the system for the first time and free service was offered thereafter several times. Commercial service started on January 30, 2009. Several additional lines are currently being planned. The Santiago light rail system is in planning stages.
There are two transportation services in the Dominican Republic: one controlled by the government, through the Oficina Técnica de Transito Terrestre (O.T.T.T.) and the Oficina Metropolitana de Servicios de Autobuses (OMSA); and the other controlled by private business, among them, Federación Nacional de Transporte La Nueva Opción (FENATRANO) and the Confederacion Nacional de Transporte (CONATRA). The government transportation system covers large routes in metropolitan areas, such as Santo Domingo and Santiago.

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Visite Las Vegas

Historically, the casinos that were not in Downtown Las Vegas along Fremont Street were restricted to outside of the city limits on Las Vegas Boulevard. In 1959 the Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas sign was constructed exactly 4.5 miles (7.2 km) outside of the city limits. The sign is today about 0.4 miles (0.64 km) south of the southernmost entrance to Mandalay Bay (the southernmost casino).
In the strictest sense, “the Strip” refers only to the stretch of Las Vegas Boulevard that is roughly between Sahara Avenue and Russell Road, a distance of 4.2 miles (6.8 km).[5][6] However, the term is often used to refer not only to the road but also to the various casinos and resorts that line the road, and even to properties which are not on the road but in proximity. Certain government agencies, such as the Nevada Gaming Commission, classify properties as “Las Vegas Strip” for reporting purposes, although these definitions can include properties which are 1 mile (1.6 km) or more away from Las Vegas Boulevard (such as the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino). Phrases such as Strip Area, Resort Corridor or Resort District are sometimes used to indicate a larger geographical area.
The Nevada Gaming Commission considers the Strip’s northern terminus as the Sahara Casino. At one time, the southern end of the Strip was Tropicana Avenue, but continuing construction has extended this boundary to Russell Road. Mandalay Bay is located just north of Russell Road and is the southernmost resort considered to be on the Strip by the Nevada Gaming Commission.
Because of the number and size of the resorts, the Resort Corridor can be quite wide. Interstate 15 runs roughly parallel and 0.5 to 0.8 mile (0.80 to 1.3 km) to the west of Las Vegas Boulevard for the entire length of the Strip. Paradise Road runs to the east in a similar fashion, and ends at St. Louis Avenue. The eastern side of the Strip is bounded by McCarran International Airport south of Tropicana Avenue. North of this point, the Resort Corridor can be considered to extend as far east as Paradise Road, although some consider Koval Lane as a less inclusive boundary. Interstate 15 is sometimes considered the western edge of the Resort Corridor from Interstate 215 to Spring Mountain Road. North of this point, Industrial Road serves as the western edge.
The Nevada Gaming Commission defines the Strip gaming area as encompassing all resorts located on Las Vegas Boulevard South between Russell Road and Sahara Avenue, as well as several nearby properties not directly located on Las Vegas Boulevard. This includes The Rio, The Palms, and several other smaller resorts west of Las Vegas Boulevard and Interstate 15, but does not include The Orleans one block further west. Properties located east of Las Vegas Boulevard on Paradise Road, such as the Las Vegas Hilton, Terrible’s Casino, Westin Casuarina Las Vegas Hotel, Casino & Spa, Hooters Casino Hotel, and the Hard Rock, are also included in this area. The Stratosphere, however, is not included in the Nevada Gaming Commission definition of the Strip since it lies north of Sahara Avenue on Las Vegas Boulevard.
The famous Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas sign is located in the median just south of Russell Road, across from the now-defunct Klondike Hotel & Casino; another similar sign is in the median at the north end of the Strip near the intersection of east St. Louis and south Main Streets.
Newer resorts such as South Point and the M Resort are on Las Vegas Boulevard South as distant as 8 miles south of the Welcome to Las Vegas sign. Marketing for these casinos usually states that they are on southern Las Vegas Boulevard and not “Strip” properties. However this area is frequently referred to as the South Strip.
[edit]History

The Bellagio, Caesars Palace, and part of the Strip
The first casino to be built on Highway 91 was the Pair-o-Dice Club in 1931, but the first on what is currently the Strip was the El Rancho Vegas, opening on April 3, 1941, with 63 rooms. That casino stood for almost 20 years before being destroyed by a fire in 1960. Its success spawned a second hotel on what would become the Strip, the Hotel Last Frontier, in 1942. Organized crime figures such as New York’s Bugsy Siegel took interest in the growing gaming center leading to other resorts such as the Flamingo, which opened in 1946, and the Desert Inn, which opened in 1950. The funding for many projects was provided through the American National Insurance Company, which was based in the then notorious gambling empire of Galveston, Texas.[7]
Several decades ago, Las Vegas Boulevard South was called Arrowhead Highway, or Los Angeles Highway. The Strip was reportedly named by Los Angeles police officer Guy McAfee, after his hometown’s Sunset Strip.[8]
In 1968, Kirk Kerkorian purchased the Flamingo and hired Sahara Hotels Vice President Alex Shoofey as President. Alex Shoofey brought along 33 of Sahara’s top executives. The Flamingo was used to train future employees of the International Hotel, which was under construction. Opening in 1969, the International Hotel, with 1,512 rooms, began the era of mega-resorts. The International is known as the Las Vegas Hilton today.
The first MGM Grand Hotel and Casino, also a Kerkorian property, opened in 1973 with 2,084 rooms. At the time, this was one of the largest hotels in the world by number of rooms. The Rossiya Hotel built in 1967 in Moscow, for instance, had 3200 rooms; however, most of the rooms in the Rossiya Hotel were single rooms of 118 sq. ft (roughly 1/4 size of a standard room at the MGM Grand Resort. On November 21, 1980, the MGM Grand suffered the worst resort fire in the history of Las Vegas, killing 87 people as a result of electrical problems. It reopened eight months later. In 1986, Kerkorian sold the MGM Grand to Bally Manufacturing, and it was renamed Bally’s.
The Wet ‘n Wild water park opened in 1985 and was located on the south side of the Sahara hotel. The park closed at the end of the 2004 season and was later demolished.

Las Vegas Strip at night with the Aladdin (Now Planet Hollywood)
The opening of The Mirage in 1989 set a new level to the Las Vegas experience, as smaller hotels and casinos made way for the larger mega-resorts. These huge facilities offer entertainment and dining options, as well as gambling and lodging. This change affected the smaller, well-known and now historic hotels and casinos, like The Dunes, The Sands and the Stardust.
In 1995, following the death of Dean Martin, the lights along the Strip were dimmed in a sign of respect to him. This was repeated in 1998 in honor of the recently deceased Frank Sinatra. In 2005, Clark County renamed a section of Industrial Road (south of Twain Avenue) as Dean Martin Drive, also as a tribute to the famous Rat Pack singer, actor, and frequent Las Vegas entertainer.
In an effort to attract families, resorts offered more attractions geared toward youth, but had limited success. The (current) MGM Grand opened in 1993 with Grand Adventures amusement park, but the park closed in 2000 due to lack of interest. Similarly, in 2003 Treasure Island closed its own video arcade and abandoned the previous pirate theme, adopting the new ti name.[9]
In addition to the large hotels, casinos and resorts, the Strip is home to a few smaller casinos and other attractions, such as M&M World, Adventuredome and the Fashion Show Mall. Starting in the mid-1990s, the Strip became a popular New Year’s Eve celebration destination.
In 2004, MGM Mirage announced plans for Project CityCenter, a 66-acre (27 ha), $7 billion multi-use project on the site of the Boardwalk hotel and adjoining land. It consists of hotel, casino, condo, retail, art, business and other uses on the site. City Center is currently the largest such complex in the world. Construction began in April 2006, with most elements of the project opened in late 2009.
In 2006, the Las Vegas Strip lost its longtime status as the world’s highest-grossing gambling center, falling to second place behind Macau.[10]

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